breaking-through-cover

Women Entrepreneurs Improving the World

Women entrepreneurs of all ages, races and ethnicities are creating jobs,  bolstering economies, strengthening families and communities, and  providing creative solutions to 21st century problems. And it doesn’t stop  there. According to “Breaking Through: Harnessing the Economic  Potential of Women Entrepreneurs,” a comprehensive new report released by the Center for an Urban Future and Capital One, women  entrepreneurs, like most business owners, start their businesses to not  only make a profit, but to also have a deeper impact on the world. Deepti Sharma Kapur originally started her online platform, Food To Eat,  to provide New Yorkers with a quick and easy solution for waiting in food  truck lines for lunch. After developing relationships with the food truck  vendors, Kapur discovered that another solution was needed – one for  helping these vendors scale their businesses. To achieve this, Deepti  spends time with these vendors, educating them about how they can use  their smartphones to do more than simply text, but also deposit checks  and manage inventory. “[The idea] comes from my maternal instinct  wanting to help a community grow and thrive,” says Kapur. “We grew  because of the way we thought about the business, not always about  making money, but how to help the community,” said Kapur. Jessamyn Rodriguez founded Hot Bread Kitchen, a unique baking  incubator, out of a desire to build lasting economic security for low‐ income, immigrant and minority individuals. The incubator, based in New  York City, teaches women from around the world to bake breads from  their homeland for commercial sales. Hot Bread Kitchen gives these  bakers the skills necessary for secure and lasting employment, keeping  their families out of poverty. What can we learn from women entrepreneurs like Rodriguez and  Kapur? There’s No Time Like Now There is no better time than right now for women entrepreneurs to start  businesses. Startup barriers have lessened, and statistics show that  women are increasingly stepping up to the plate to become new  business leaders. From 2002 to 2012, the most recent year for which  rigorous data is available, the number of women‐owned businesses grew  by 65 percent, or 45 new businesses per day, adding over 56,000 jobs  and $3 billion in payroll to the city’s economy.  What’s more, the report  suggests, “… in many cases, all that’s needed to start a company is a  laptop, a desk and a cup of coffee — and the desk is optional.”  Many  women are starting businesses right in their homes, often right at their  kitchen tables. That said, there are resources available, including shared ...